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September, 2014

A Hotel Life

Rockaway Baeach: Truck-a-Float

HIGHS + LOWS

Interesting, hidden location at Marina 59 on the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge just minutes away from the surf.

As a living art project, Truck-A-Float opens one’s mind to sustainable, eco-conscious possibilities in a truly modern, urban environment.

The pods are sweet - waking up on the water in New York City is an amazing experience, and improvements in the neighborhood continue to draw new, young visitors to this emerging artistic enclave.

 

August 27, 2014

Inhabitat New York

Spend the Night in This Floating Eco-Hotel Made Out of Recycled Truck Parts

Looking for an off-the-beaten-path way to enjoy the last days of summer? How does staying at a floating, sustainable hotel made from repurposed truck parts sound? Designed by architects Matteo Pinto and Carolina Cisneros of design company ComboColab, the Truck-a-Float Hotel offers four separate sleeping pods made out of old windowed truck cabs. The unique accommodations, moored at Marina 59 in Far Rockaway, will only set you back between $60 and $90 per night.

Read more: Rockaway's Truck-a-Float Hotel Features Four Floating Eco-Pods Made Out of Used Truck Parts | Inhabitat New York City 

 

August 26, 2014

Miguel Lacruz

Night Time at the Truck a Float

"We spend two nights in Rockaway beach at the Truck a Floats, and I couldn't resist to make a time-lapse, the only shame is that I wasn't prepared and the camera batteries die before the sunrise. You can still feel the flow of JFK and the water."

 

 

August 22, 2014

Cool Hunting

Truck-A-Float, a Hotel in Rockaway

Set adrift in this delightful and inventive accommodation made from automobile parts in Queens, NY

While the end of summer is nearing in the Northern Hemisphere, there's still time to squeeze in a few more beach weekends. For a delightful overnight in Rockaway, Queens, there is a brand new kind of hotel called Truck-A-Float—a collection of four sleeping pods, each topped with the windowed cap of a truck cab. In all, the experience is akin to camping on the water.

 

July 3, 2014 

NewYork.com

5 Things to Do in the Rockaways This Summer

How would you like to sleep out on the water? Check out Truck-a-Float, a creative new “installation” moored at Marina 59. Constructed from recycled truck parts, each floating room has a sleeping platform with full-size cot, fan, mosquito netting, folding table, and cooler. Think of it as an adventure!  59-14 Beach Channel Dr.; truck-a-float.tumblr.com

 

May 16, 2014 

Gothamist

Your Floating Rockaway Hotel Options This Summer

"This floating hotel is also a "sustainable living art adventure!" Moored at Marina 59, where Boatel is also anchored, is Truck-A-Float. The community of four rentable pods are broken down into the Century Horseshoe, the GMC Diamondbacks, the Jeraco Barnacle, and the Jeraco Swan—all named for the materials that went into building them."

 
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May 15, 2014 

Bedford + Bowery 

Rockaway Rundown: New Beach Grub + the Ferry, Beer Bus, Floating Hotel Return 

"Araujo describes the Truck-a-Float as “a cabin floating on the water” but these are actually pickup-truck canopies that have been turned into floating pods – each equipped with a sofa bed, fan, mosquito netting, a folding table, a tea kettle, and a cooler. If that sounds too Spartan for the cost (about $60 per night on the weekdays and $80 per night on the weekends), rest assured Araujo herself lives in one of these cute little cocoons. She and her partners are currently working on making them solar powered."

 

March 29 - June 30, 2013

VW Dome 2 EXPO 1: New York, MoMA PS1 

Selected Submission for EXPO 1: New York's Rockaway Call For Ideas 

In an effort to foster the creative debate on urban recovery after Hurricane Sandy, MoMA PS1 and MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design initiated a call for ideas to create a sustainable waterfront.  

Artists, architects, designers, and others responded to the call by presenting ideas for alternative housing models, the creation of social spaces, urban interventions, new uses of public space, the rebuilding of the boardwalk, protection of the shoreline, and actions to engage local communities